gallery visit: to Bronte Parsonage Haworth -the drawings of Victoria Brookland

On the 28th June we visited the Bronte parsonage Haworth. On display in the shop area were drawings by Victoria Brookland which seemed in place with Haworth and the Bronte novels. The pictures are of Victorian dresses but have within them other images such as a city or animals or plants, which reflect the dark mystery of the Bronte novels, I feel that the manner in which she uses black and white in pencil,ink, collage and watercolour adds to the reflection of drama which emanates from the bleak moorland around Haworth.

“Victoria Brookland’s work investigates how women writers have employed the Gothic genre to reveal hidden aspects of their own natures. … has spent the past few years exploring the lives and writing of nineteenth-century women.Her first series of Bronte inspired paintings, Secret Self, was exhibited at the Brontë Parsonage Museum in 2007 and explored the dresses in the collection. ….”   quotes taken from the Bronte society web site -sourced on line (June 2013)  ref:http://www.bronte.org.uk/whats-on/50/victoria-brookland-a-thousand-thousand-gleaming-fires/51

art work by Victoria Brookland sourced on line(June 2013) from:http://kleurrijkbrontesisters.blogspot.co.uk/2010/05/victoria-brookland.html

Victoria Brookland art at Haworth June 2013 001

scanned from a post card bought in Haworth showing the drawing: “the peregrine is stronger” by Victoria Brookland (card printed by Abacus (Colour Printers) Ltd Cumbria).

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exercise :a sketch book walk and looking at Ugo Rondinone

Another artist involved in the intricate depiction of nature but in a completely different manner to Ryoko Aoki. Discovered in the book Drawing Now “Edited by Downs, Marshall,Sawdon,Selby and Tormey  “Drawing Now Between the Lines of Contemporary Art” published by I.B. Tauris ) Ugo Ronidone’s ink on paper drawings in black and white are detailed experiments in depiction through contrasting white and black. The overall impression is intricate but the page is full of monochrome activity with blocks of black of varying sizes, some hatched tone and a few speckles but totally contrasting with the drawings of Ryoko Aoki. He is of Sswiss extract and lives in New York. The pictures have German titles which try as I may I can not understand.I am unsure if he may have used some form of resist in sketching these pictures.

Ugo Rondinone:


ZWANZIGSTERJANUARNEUNZEHN-HUNDERTFÜNFUNDNEUNZIG Sammlung Deutsche Bank

On line image: ref:http://db-artmag.de/archiv/03/e/aktuell-neorauch.html (sourced June 2013)

My drawing -turning through 90 degrees –The willow and the comfrey.

the willow and the comfrey

Concentrating entirely on black ink and pen drawing the dark shadows (negative space) rather than outlines of leaves.Using a variety of marks and reducing pressure and ink tone for the background, this picture has a dramatic feel by virtue of its tonal contrasts. It is much more focused than the wider woodland drawings of Ugo Rondinone but very enjoyable to draw. I wondered if redrawing using wax resist may produce a finer and more dappled impression as in Ugo’s woodland.

the little willow

I don’t like the yellow sunlight patches which were done in wax crayon and having chosen green ink detracts from the drama of the intense black and white image. I do however like th confusion of line and block.

Both these images are obviously much more focused than the larger image incorporated in Rondinone’s forest, but I think they work quite well.

REMEMBER –totally lost don’t know which way I am going

Tool for reflection—

Document the route by which you have arrived at your final piece of work!!!!—turning subconscious learning into consciousness and so into memory?

Cross reference sections with your assignment work

Record, structure, reflect upon, plan, develop and evidence your own learning and skills development.

A record of what you have learned, tried and critically reflected upon.

Am I being honest? 

Is this a useful process for me? 

Is this helping my own process of learning? 

Put in drawings ( in my sketch book), photocopies—(?downloads from web), postcards, press cuttingnotes on visits to museums and exhibitions. I have a filing drawer full of paper postcards, pictures, gallery leaflets which I do not have the time to scan –perhaps I should go through them and make notes in log if relevant to my work.

Current thoughts on your subject and your enthusiasm for a particular artist   My enthusiasm was at rock botttom but finally having spent the day on art rather than computing it is being reignited.