Charles Rennie Mackintosh and artists of the art nouveau

Mackintosh Images and most of life history derived from the book :  “The Life, Times and Work of Charles Rennie Mackintosh” by K.E. Sullivan  published by Brockhampton Press 1997 ISBN 1 86019 798 1

Rennie Mackintosh was born in Glasgow in 1868. He had a love of nature and became an architect as well as attending art school.

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Early Flower study in pencil and watercolour  obtained by photographing the image from “The Life Times and Work of Charles Rennie Mackintosh” by K.E. Sullivan  published by Brockhampton Press 1997 ISBN 1 86019 798 1

After visiting Italy in 1891 mackintosh returned to Scotland vowing to give his country “its own architectural language”. His style was assisted by the art of Japan. With three other artists, Herbert MacNair  and two sisters Frances and Margaret MacDonald a style was developed which was based on their interests in poetry, the celtic world , symbolism and mysticism. With MacNair he started to  work with animal and vegetable forms and strong colours.

Images by Margaret MacDonald:

November 5th   1894

http://www.artmagick.com/pictures/picture.aspx?id=5222&name=november-5th

Herbert Mac Nair:

Fountain Pencil and Watercolour on paper

http://www.huntsearch.gla.ac.uk/cgi-bin/foxweb/huntsearch/DetailedResults.fwx?collection=all&SearchTerm=41046&mdaCode=GLAHA&reqMethod=Link

Frances Mac Doanald

Golden Heart by Frances MacDonald MacNair

ref:http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/walker/exhibitions/doves/liverpool1900/golden_heart_mcnair.aspx

All these images by the three other artists in MacKintoshes group show the characteristic lines, tall “vertically stretched” images and swirls found in Mackintoshes work. The swirls represented plants or hair. In the image by Margaret MacDonald, the characteristic roses found in Mackintoshes images appear.

These four artists were influenced by Audrey Beardsley’s Yellow book images :

Design for title page 111  The Yellow Book   ref:   http://www.wormfood.com/savoy/yellow_book/275.html

and by Patrick Gedde’s images in his magazine “The Evergreen”

Natura Naturans  Robert Burns 1891 from “The Evergreen” magazine  ref: http://www.patrickgeddestrust.co.uk/celticcompositionrobertburns.htm

“Mackintosh focused on images of roots, stems, branches and flowers with vertical lines and swooping elegant lines”. The four were involved in poster design. Mackintosh also designed furniture and incorporated his details on glass. He often used the stylized rose motif in his images and developed a balance between geometric shapes and the curves of nature:

One of the commonest features of Mackintosh’s designs is the contrast between  black and white squares and coloured floral designs:

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Floral and chequered fabric design  image obtained by photographing image from book “The Life Times and Work of Charles Rennie Mackintosh” by K.E. Sullivan  published by Brockhampton Press 1997 ISBN 1 86019 798 1

IMG_9602Detail of a wall stencil from Hill House

Image obtained by photographing the image from “The Life Times and Work of Charles Rennie Mackintosh” by K.E. Sullivan  published by Brockhampton Press 1997 ISBN 1 86019 798 1

copying this image:

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and adding my own twist to the honesty seeds and grasses:

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In a similar vein ans around the same era Alphonse Mucha was using the long tresses and curves of natural plants to produce images often used in posters:

Alphonse Mucha 1860-1939

A Moravian (Austro-Hungary) painter of the late 19th century Art Nouveau movement famous for his ideallized paintings of women with flowing hair and clothing, often for posters.

Alphonse Mucha study of dishware and cutlery 1902  in gouache

ref:http://www.wikipaintings.org/en/alphonse-mucha/studies-1902

The use of black and white gouache and pencil on coloured paper. Swirling patterns and arrangements with paper showing through to indicate the reflective surfaces of the objects

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